L&S Honors Program

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Honors Only Courses (H)

What is an Honors Only course?

Honors Only courses are designated by an H in the Schedule of Classes. They are...

  • Reserved for Honors students only.
  • Small courses (usually 20 students or fewer) or special discussion sections, facilitated by a professor, that are attached to a larger class.
  • Taught by a faculty member who is an expert in the subject-matter of the course.
  • Designed to challenge you to actively participate; hence, the course content is often shaped by your and your peers' questions and interests.
  • Characterized by discussion and interactive learning, rather than passive experiences (e.g., listening and note-taking).
  • Automatic Honors courses and, consequently, a critical component of the HLA degree track. Honors only courses may also fulfill HM requirements, depending on your department's curriculum.

Examples of Honors Only courses

Political Science 184: Introduction to American Politics

This course addresses the basic institutions and processes of American government, including the role of constitutional structures, parties, interest groups and elections; policy formation; and policy comment. The course is capped at 20 students, taught by a UW professor and incorporates an interactive, discussion-based curriculum. In comparison, the non-Honors counterpart to Political Science 184 (Political Science 104) has 414 students; lectures are taught by a UW professor, and small weekly discussion sections are led by a graduate student teaching assistant.

Journalism 201: Introduction to Mass Communication

This course covers such topics as: how the mass media are organized and how they function in modern society, their technological basis, their economic and political foundations, and their social implications. Journalism 201 enrolls over 350 students, with small weekly discussion sections led by a graduate student teaching assistant; Honors students, in contrast, enroll in a separate discussion section facilitated by the course professor.